Tag: digital marketing

Social Media

It’s a Facebook Thing: Connecting Users With The Products They Want

 

You’re scrolling through your newsfeed, you see a sweatshirt that has your name or your profession in a catchphrase, and it’s only $30. It feels weird to see something so distinctly “you” pop up. So, how does Facebook do that? If you feel like Facebook has more ads than usual, you aren’t dreaming it up; Facebook has been hitting all of us with more ads that are more relevant to us. Although it may seem unnerving at first, Facebook’s data collection tools are fascinating and can often connect users with products they want.

 

Facebook uses your profile to create personalized ads. If you like Target’s Facebook page, then Target will start delivering ads to you. Facebook will deliver ads to you based on what your friends like. However, it’s not just what you and your friends are doing alone that generates ads; it’s also demographic information. Major life events like getting engaged or married will produce content specifically for you. If you are recently engaged and post it to Facebook, wedding dresses and wedding venues will start to populate your feed. Kind of cool, huh?

When an advertiser creates an on Facebook, it can select all sorts of parameters, so it reaches the right people. For example, if someone is trying to sell a swimsuit: They can target it towards people that live near large bodies of water or has swimming listed in their interests. The more information you put about yourself on Facebook such as your age, where you live, where you graduated college, activities you like and where you work: This all will determine what ads are delivered to you.

If you don’t include all of this information on your profile, Facebook turns to your friends to fill the gaps. Facebook only needs to know one particular thing about you, like where you live, and what your friends provide to create a reasonable demographic that advertisers can use to reach you.

Let’s say you have a Facebook account just for the sake of having a profile. Facebook collects data through companies such as Datalogix, Acxiom, Epsilon, and BlueKai. These companies collect information about you through things like store loyalty cards, mailing lists, public records, browser cookies and more. So, if you are a customer at Starbucks and utilize their rewards program, you will see a Starbucks ad pop up on your Facebook at some point, or even a tee-shirt with a coffee cup on it saying Coffee Addict.

These data collection companies know more than you would think: race, gender, buying habits, economic status and more. If you don’t use loyalty cards or enroll in reward programs when you shop, Facebook still has you pinpointed. If you purchase a car at a dealership, they will more than likely ask you for your email to send you reminders about car servicing and more. That dealership wants to advertise on Facebook, so they upload a list of all of the email addresses they have. That data is then made private, and Facebook pairs the email addresses with the one you registered on Facebook. If these match, you might see an ad from that dealership on Facebook. Your friends might see the same ad from the dealership because they are reaching out to their target audience.

There’s no reason to feel a little spooked by all of this, but all of this information is kept private. Facebook uses a system called hashing to prevent from all of your private information from leaking. When you went to the grocery store last week, and you tried a new brand of yogurt that has just launched and used your discount card at check-out, Facebook might have delivered an ad for that yogurt that you had not seen previously. Don’t worry; it’s not because your phone heard you say how delicious it was at first bite.

Here at Velocity Agency, we pride ourselves in our knowledge of data collection and ad targeting. If you are trying to expand your target audience, we can help you take your brand to new heights. We have the knowledge and experience to make those internet users stop mid-scroll and CLICK the purchase button.

Velocity News

The Pets of Velocity Agency

You’ve met all the humans of Velocity, but now it’s time to meet the Veloci-dogs! In honor of National Dog Day, we thought we’d introduce you to our favorite furballs!

 

Layla Sutton, Social Media Manager

“This is Brother! I named him this because I have a younger brother who lives in VA that I am really close to and when I moved to New Orleans it was hard to not live in the same area as him. I got him in January when he was 6 weeks old so that I would have a walking partner and someone to explore the city with and he has become my best friend. Brother loves food more than I do which says a LOT. His favorite things to do is steal cotton balls from the bathroom, go to the dog park to play with other dogs and he’s actually a really good cuddler. His favorite toy is his giant tennis ball. ”

Beau Runnels, Editor

“I never had a dog, but my dad did raise a wolf. Her name was Feather and she was a sweetheart. She loved children, especially the chewy ones. This is a photo of my dad reading to some school kids, Feather was there to protect him in case one of the little thugs tried to knife him. Feather had a scar on her nose from when she found out porcupines were indeed not made from pork. She called them Needle-Rats from then on… Feather also talked, but cursed a lot. RIP Feather 1995-2011”

 

Linda Nickerson, Office Manager
“This is my dog Abby.  She is 5 years old and was a rescue from the 9th ward in New Orleans.  She has two cat brothers (Coal and Stanley) to protect her!!”

 

Josh Spencer, SEO Manager
“All I have to contribute is my family’s Mini Australian Shepard. His name is Percy, and he cries so incessantly when he has to ride in the car that we have to feed him little doggie valiums to calm him down.”

 

Alex Dufresne, Jr. Editor
“This is my sister’s boxer, Balboa Seabiscuit, but we call him Bo for short. His hobbies include staring at interesting things off camera and relaxing on his private Yacht. He is also the reason I refer to Beau Runnells as “Human Beau” when talking to my family. I know I could just say “Dog Bo” instead, but that would be silly. “

 

Alison Pitre, Account Manager
“Meet Chuy, we rescued her from the streets of New Orleans about 4 years ago and she has had my heart from the first day I saw her. She is the sweetest little Chihuahua in the world! On a fat day, she is 5 lbs. She howls like a wolf and spins like a ballerina when excited. Meet Gidget, she is half Chihuahua and half Corgi. We adopted her from the SPCA 3 years ago. Don’t let her teddy bear good looks fool you…she will tear your face off. Meet Tchoupitoulas, we adopted her from the SPCA about 5 years ago. She is a pit bull mix. Tchoup likes to spend her days laying on the sofa watching Steve Harvey. She also likes to go for short walks on the levee. She loves playing with Chuy.  She is afraid of cats.”

 

Emily Kranz, Media Assistant
“This is Dexter. He’s a 2 1/2-year-old Shih Tzu. His hobbies include indulging on treats, chasing frisbees that are bigger than he his, and pretending he’s from Endor by rocking his Ewok costume.”

 

Danielle Doty, Social Media Manager
“Spooky and Savage were the only two in their litter. They are long haired dachshunds who are inseparable and love to get into trouble. I originally planned only to adopt one, but then I came home with two puppies. Oops! Spooky is full of energy and always up for an adventure, whereas Savage is patient and gentle (except with lizards).”

 

Chase Treadway, Web Developer
“This is Delta, AKA ‘Hot mess’. AKA ‘That’s not your food.’ AKA ‘no ma’am.’ AKA ‘I’m sorry, my child is a con artist, and I’m not responsible for those genes'”
Social Media

MySpace’s Decline into Facebook’s Uprising

Move over Tom! Oh, hi, Mark!

Long before you were on Facebook, there was a site that many of us had a space on that was just for us. It was appropriately named MySpace, and everyone quickly jumped on board to have one. In the spring of 2008, MySpace was the top social media site in the world. In April of that same year, Facebook grabbed the lead and never looked back. Over the next three years, Myspace would lose over forty million unique visitors per month, lose both of its co-founders, and lay off most of their staff.

How did this happen so fast?

First things first, it’s important to know why and how MySpace started. In 2003, MySpace was created by people in the entertainment industry, not by technology experts and therefore could not innovate at the pace that they needed to compete.  However, MySpace was greatly influential in the music industry. In late 2003, Fin Leavell encoded his music into a myspace profile, becoming the first MySpace musician. Shortly after MySpace was sold to Rupert Murdoch, the owner of Fox News and 20th Century Fox, they launched a record label: MySpace Records. The record label was made to discover unknown talent on MySpace Music. Some well-known singers such as Lily Allen, Owl City, Hollywood Undead, Sean Kingston, and Arctic Monkeys rose to fame through myspace.

Although Rupert’s idea of incorporating a record label with MySpace was a smart business move, Rupert had an old school way of thought and is said to be a major contributor to the fall of MySpace. Critics claim that MySpace failed to execute the product development by not copying Facebook in design quickly after Facebook launched.

Facebook let third-party developers create apps on the site in 2007 while MySpace held tight to the notion that it would be able to create its own products. This strategy slowed down the process tremendously for MySpace to stay on top of the ever changing market. The former head of MySpace, Mike Jones, has stated that MySpace put up barriers to user enjoyment by forcing members to use anonymous pseudonyms in the place of their real identities, where Facebook encouraged members to use their real names.

Once Facebook took off, MySpace decided to give up on its social media leadership dreams and narrowed its focus to being a social entertainment destination. However, this has not been proven as a successful venture either. Many other websites have followed MySpace’s lead by creating music streaming sites such as Bandcamp which allows musicians to get paid for their music by allowing consumers to buy tracks or albums online.

When it comes to social media and website development, there are six lessons that we can learn from MySpace’s failure.

  • Authenticity is important 
    • The success of Facebook and the corresponding demise of MySpace is partially due to real names adding an aura of legitimacy while removing a layer of anonymous creepiness.

     

  • Standardization is better than free-range 
    • Facebook allows minimal customization regarding overall layout, look and feel. This feature has proven to be successful.

     

  • Mobile is critical
    • MySpace was slow to adopt mobile technology, and the lack of MySpace in your pocket is partly responsible for their decline.

     

  • Think beyond your website 
    • There has never been any significant effort to distribute MySpace broadly across the web by implementing it into other sites. Facebook has made it so that a user can use their Facebook login for a multitude of apps, making registering for new accounts incredibly simple and making Facebook almost a necessity.

     

  • Be business-friendly
    • MySpace has always been user-focused rather than business-focused and has rarely created features specifically for business.

     

  • Don’t sell too early
    •  MySpace made the biggest mistake by selling prematurely in 2006.

Facebook seems to have real staying power for the time being because of their highly adaptive nature and versatility and friendliness in the ever growing internet world. Here at Velocity, we pride ourselves in staying ahead of social media trends and implementing ingredients for success in our marketing strategies. We understand the importance of not only monitoring where social media platforms succeed but also where they fail. If you are in need of social media experts to take your brand to the next level, you know where to go!

Market Information

What’s in the Box?

Online shopping started in 1994 and spread like wildfire in 2017. As a result, nearly 79% of Americans shop exclusively online. People have ditched waiting in long lines, driving through traffic, and searching for the best bargain by simply scrolling through the World Wide Web. It doesn’t get much simpler than being able to type in anything that you are looking for and setting filters to narrow it down to your preferred product. Business owners discovered they needed to be innovative and develop a new way to sell their goods online. Thus came the birth of an entirely unique time in online shopping: The Box Pop.

Subscription boxes are everywhere. Chances are if you are on the internet, there’s at least one subscription box beckoning your wallet. Birchbox put the subscription box retail trend in motion with its launch in 2010, with a specialty in beauty, grooming and lifestyle products. Birchbox subscribers pay $10-$20 to receive goodies like skin rejuvenators, fragrances, and makeup. This company has 800,000 active global subscribers which equal a total of $96 million in annual sales.

Just like with any successful business model, the imitators quickly followed suit. There are subscription boxes for everything from razors, tactical gear, video games, clothing, and of course: food.  In 2012, Blue Apron was founded and is now known as the gold standard for food delivery services. Each Blue Apron box contains enough food for you and your family (2-4 people) and offers a very reasonable price range ($59.94 – $69.92).

Subscription boxes have risen to fame because of three different reasons: convenience, personalization, and excitement. Subscription boxes are a perfect example of experiential marketing, a strategy that directly engages consumers and encourages them to participate in the evolution of a brand or a brand experience. Therefore, creating a consumer-producer relationship with the brand.

Convenience

There’s nothing more convenient than coming home from a long day’s work to see a box on your doorstep full of goodies; meal kits offer a hassle-free way to prepare dinner after work. Some consumers don’t like to get off of work and then face the stress of determining a recipe, shopping for ingredients, and preparing a meal. With meal subscription boxes, all of that is taken care of for you. There are even specialized subscription meal boxes made for those with particularly demanding schedules such as college students.

Personalization

The difference between the average consumer now compared to ten years ago is the value placed on personalization. After all, we live in a time where there’s a space for each of us on the internet that we can personalize and make our own through social media. Upon subscribing to a box, subscribers are asked a series of questions. Some have a list of all of their products with check boxes for the customer to click, while others have text boxes where customers explain their product preferences in detail. Consumers have the chance to put a little of themselves in their ordering and feel special in the process.

Excitement

You’ve already skipped the stress of real-life shopping, and you have defined yourself by making your product preferences known. Now it’s time for the fun part: the excitement of the box on your doorstep. Because the business asks what makes you tick, you know that the box is going to contain products you will love. But, it’s the feeling of it being a gift and a surprise that really has jump-started this marketing trend. This type of excitement isn’t just trending with subscription boxes either. Unboxing videos routinely take a few of the top 10 spots on most-viewed YouTube watch lists, among the music videos from international superstars and the latest viral prank.

Even though the marketing model for subscription boxes seems to have everything that we as consumers want, some recent news has made many of these business owners wary. The subscription box business is not immune to the same dangers of other, more traditional businesses. Many of these companies have been reporting a dramatic slump in sales and must think of ways to increase sales. The subscription box market is severely saturated, with more than 2,000 different types of boxes to offer and steadily growing. Also, big companies such as Starbucks, Sephora, Macy’s, and Adidas are joining in the craze which is making the smaller companies lose steam rapidly.

What do you think the next step will be for these business owners to stay on top?

Market Information

What Internet Privacy Rollbacks Means For Marketers

 

 

Online advertising is an $83 billion market – meaning that digital marketing is imperative. Recently, Congress made a decision that is bound to disrupt the internet marketing world. Congress voted to put the brakes on Internet privacy rules set in place by the Obama Administration. The online privacy protections that were set into motion in October 2016 are regarded as revolutionary legislation. And now, the Trump Administration is being given the option to retract these protections. This event presents marketers with a tremendous opportunity, but should they capitalize on it? The doors are opening for marketers (but, really, they are remaining open) to build upon their treasure trove of consumer data.

In actuality, the legislation protecting Internet privacy had not yet gone into effect. The sudden uproar is spurred by the potential for FCC Internet privacy rollback. Cable firms and wireless providers can potentially exploit your browsing history, shopping habits, your location and other information harvested from your online activity. With all of this information on a specific person, internet service providers (ISPs) can sell highly targeted ads for a hefty price. ISPs could compete with Google and Facebook in the $83 billion online advertising market. Inherently, ISPs have very detailed information on consumers and a better understanding of who is using what device in the home. Fewer privacy restrictions mean internet service providers can look more closely at behavior that marketers eagerly want details on, like mobile behavior and app usage.

Is there a good side to privacy protections being put on the chopping block? ISPs could leverage privacy and use it as a selling point. It’s a given that consumers would be concerned about their data leaking. Data leakage could be a threat to a brand’s image and consumer loyalty. Therefore, offering heightened security could become an attractive feature for companies to advertise. FCC’s broadband privacy protections would have prevented Internet service providers from selling personal data like web browsing history without prior consent. However, the rule had not yet gone into effect. It can be argued that nothing has, or will, change. Sales of personal data is a much-feared but highly unlikely scenario.

Digital Innovation, Market Information, Research

Retargeting Digital Strategy | Velocity Agency | New Orleans

Retargeting velocity agency new orleans advertising

How do you only display digital ads to users interested in your brand? The current solution is retargeting. Over the past decade, new online technologies have made it possible for websites to interact with your browser and privately track your navigation.

Retargeting or re-marketing aims to fix a problem most marketers face online: users abandoning or “bouncing” from their client’s site before completing an action (“converting”). Whether you want a user to buy a product, submit a form, and/or sign up for a newsletter, retargeting will follow your website visitors throughout their online sessions. Regardless of their navigation after visiting your site, tracking pixels allow your digital display ads to appear. Thus, increasing brand awareness to an interested user.

Because retargeting allows you to communicate with users that already visited your website, your creative should be dynamic and act as a reminder to come back. The creative should also reflect consistency with the specific pages visited. However, you need to be careful not to appear intrusive or you will lose the prospective customer/client.

As with everything online, some privacy concerns arise over retargeting practices. The technology basically adds a cookie to a user’s browser, which then follows the user around the Internet. This process is maintains personal anonymity, as no identifiable personal information is ever transferred or documented.

Like traditional digital display ads, retargeting allows you to track conversions and determine which creative is most effective. Also, reports show a dramatic drop in cost-per-click for retargeted content, as users that have visited your website are more likely to click your ads.

This technology can be used in various ways. An eCommerce site will benefit from targeting users that visit specific product pages and tackle shopping cart abandonment. In this case, ads can focus on further educating users about specific products, increasing probability of conversion.

Also, retargeting is widely utilized in email marketing campaigns. Once a user opens your eBlast, the process of tracking hyper-targeted display begins. As a byproduct, this increases user retention and attraction.

Remarketing is now a benchmark in effective and efficient digital marketing strategies. The immediate result of targeting interested users is an increase in conversion rates. Brand awareness is merely a starting point. Honing in on interested users narrows the conversion pathway and dramatically increases the possibility of increasing top-line revenues.

Velocity Agency is a digital marketing and advertising firm specializing in digital and internet marketing & advertising, print, web design, graphic design, film, and HD video promotion and post-production. Velocity serves clients all over the United States from our Metairie, LA office just outside of New Orleans by strategically implementing proprietary tools and techniques to get you the most conversions for your business through lead generation, cost-per-acquisition, and top line revenue.

Market Information

Universal Analytics reaches prime time with tracking changes | VELOCITY AGENCY | NEW ORLEANS, LA

Roll out the red-carpet, Google’s Universal Analytics has left beta and has already begun changing the way visits to our devices are tracked. Since the introduction of Universal Analytics in 2012, Google has been hard at work looking at additional means for marketers to track user engagement with their websites to increase conversions. Last week Google, doing what they do best, unveiled a consolidated view for tracking user engagement on separate devices in one easy to see report.

How it works?

In the digital age, it’s safe to assume that a large part of your target market utilizes multiple channels for accessing your content – websites, mobile apps, web apps, and other digital devices. All of these channels can be a lot to go through to determine how to best market to your customers. You talked, Google listened. Tada! Introducing the ability to view web and app data in a single report! (Ooo and Ahh).

How it works you ask? It’s quite simple. You can now see all data reported from one Google Analytics property to a single view – regardless of how you collected that data. You can still view data separately if needed by utilizing various filters, dimensions, and segmentations. If you don’t send all of your traffic data to the same property, this change will not affect your data.

What to expect?

The biggest change recently announced by Google Analytics is the change of usage metrics “Visitors” and “Unique Visitors” to “Sessions” and “Users.” Although the motivation for this change is unclear, it is expected that this change is a result of Google’s desire to better deliver analytics traffic for marketers. Sessions are customizable depending on your business and end after 30 minutes so as not to duplicate visits to your site from the same visitor. For websites with more content, it is recommended to have longer sessions, while less content should have shorter sessions.

Velocity Agency is a digital marketing and advertising firm specializing in digital and internet marketing & advertising, print, web design, graphic design, film, and HD video promotion and post-production. Velocity serves clients all over the United States from our Metairie, LA office just outside of New Orleans by strategically implementing proprietary tools and techniques to get you the most conversions for your business through lead generation, cost-per-acquisition, and top line revenue.

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