How Can Retailers Capitalize on the International E-commerce Opportunity this Christmas?

velocity Market Information, Seasonal Leave a Comment

With the global market for international e-commerce valued at $230 Billion in 2014, and predicted to surge to $1 Trillion by 2020, the business opportunity for online retailers has never been greater[1]. International consumers are increasingly favoring shopping from the comfort of their own homes and this is even more appealing during the holiday period, as it avoids the big crowds and stress that Christmas shopping entails. Empowered by the supercomputer in their pocket, consumers are in control. With nearly every 18-54 year-old using a smartphone[2], it comes as no surprise that consumer expectations will reach new heights when it comes to shopping across channels and devices.

Research from Adobe’s Digital Index suggests this year’s festive season now represents 20% of worldwide online spending[3]. With Christmas offering a massive amount of potential revenue for retailers, ambitious brands need to make sure they have the right processes in place to capitalize on the online opportunity – not just nationally, but globally.

International e-commerce promises a great deal of revenue potential for retailers as it offers brands an unprecedented ability to quickly grow businesses internationally, enabling them to offer their goods to customers in foreign markets. Commitment to delivering a seamless shopping experience, without the need for a physical presence, will be the driving force global online sales this Christmas.

The problem is, many retailers often struggle to match impressive homeland sales in international markets. This is due to various cross-border barriers to e-commerce such as high shipping rates, unknown import duties, inefficient returns, and difficulties supporting local currencies and payment methods. These issues take on new weight in the competitive Christmas climate where poor customer service will send shoppers elsewhere.

 

The following four considerations are a necessity[4]:

  1. Have multiple shipping options at reasonable rates. Providing a simple and risk-free returns process is crucial for every customer, as it gives them confidence to buy online with you.
  2. Offer the local currency. There are few things more off-putting to online shoppers than the need to calculate the cost in their own currency while browsing, not to mention exchange rates.
  3. Always aim to put the customer’s mind at ease. Avoid any potential surprises for customers by being upfront about these transactional costs.
  4. In most cases, avoid translating your website content or building local sites. These tasks require high investment and usually generate low return. Therefore, hold off on any action until you have proven yourself within the new market(s).

 

The key rule of international trade is that, in order to be successful, customers must enjoy a great shopping experience regardless of their location. This is where the much-forgotten, often disregarded, user experience (UX) is paramount. To keep customers engaged, retailers need to make sure their e-commerce portal is simple, intuitive, safe, and seamless.

These are some important UX considerations for e-commerce:

  1. Seamless touchpoints: Many consumers now utilize several devices before completing a single purchase – for example a shopper might research offers on a phone and complete the transaction on a laptop when he or she gets home. Retailers that allow consumers to move seamlessly between devices will come out on top this year. Remember that a mobile first strategy is becoming a prerequisite for an e-commerce presence.
  2. What I want, when I want, and where I want it: To succeed, companies must have a complete view of stock at all times and offer services like click and collect, specified delivery times, and even delivery lockers. It is the consumer that dictates transaction channels and fulfillment.
  3. Personalization: When consumers share their location, preferences and device information, retailers must use them to deliver messages in a tailored, non-intrusive, and relevant way.
  4. The new service experience: Intelligent retailers see the value in extending their services far beyond the basics. Some brands are two-way conversation with consumers and digitally connecting with them to provide insights and/or help with items purchased. Businesses can take advantage of the chance to become the go-to solution for customers’ needs by going above and beyond what’s offered by the competition.

 

Brands cannot afford to ignore the cross-border e-commerce opportunity this Christmas. Achieving this doesn’t necessarily require massive time and resource investment in-house either; retailers can find a global partner to better service their needs and meet international sales expectations, increasing the ROI of going global.

Technology partners can support retailers in providing a seamless international e-commerce experience and offer customers the level of service that is essential in the competitive retail market. Without the assurance of a localized experience, accurate timings for delivery and transparency in total cost of sale, retailers will see their consumers abandon purchases or move to competitor sites in a matter of clicks.

[1] www.global-e.com

[2] www.emarketer.com

[3] www.blogs.adobe.com/digitaldialogue/news-reports/christmas-online-shopping

[4] https://www.marketingtechblog.com/retailers-international-ecommerce/

Smartphone App Fatigue

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Smartphone users are suffering from app fatigue. It seems like every week there is a new app I’m downloading: Uber, GetMyBoat, Afterlight, Enlight, PDF Pro, etc. The bad news for app makers is that I probably won’t keep the apps very long. It’s not just personal experience saying this, it’s data.

A new survey conducted by Research Now reports that 49% of US smartphone users use 6-10 smartphone apps a week. A Pew Research Center report adds a little more depth and says 30% of US smartphone app downloaders had 1-10 apps downloaded on their phone as of February; another 32% had 11-20. This report revealed different  usage numbers with 46% of respondents using 1-5 apps per week and only 35% using 6-10.

When looking at long-term usage the results get worse. According to AppsFlyer, most apps are not even kept a full day. Data from July 2015 showed 29.1% of apps download by Android users were retained for at least a day but it was only 25.5% for iOS users. At the end of 30 days 3.3% of Android and 3.2% of iOS users still had active users.

You should keep this data in mind when you are creating an app. The reality is that unless your app provides some sort of utility people won’t use it. For some brands this might be easy, like Kraft creating a recipe app. For others you will need to be creative, like Charmin who developed the ‘Sit or Squat’ app to help people find public restrooms. These apps provide a utility (i.e. solve a customer problem) that extends beyond the brand and may only be tangentially related to what you sell.

Velocity Vice President Guest Lectures at Loyola University

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Our Vice President, Kevin Conway, was invited to be a guest lecturer in Dr. Todd Bacile’s Electronic Marketing class at Loyola University New Orleans College of Business. Velocity has been working with Dr. Bacile to prepare future marketing students for the ever-evolving digital landscape. Based on our input, his Electronic Marketing Class has been re-designed to also train marketing students to be Google AdWords certified.

The class focuses on search marketing, but it also dives deep into social media marketing. Conway had the chance to speak with the students about the importance of mastering digital marketing technologies.

Mr. Conway said, “The age of making a pretty ad and throwing it over the wall is over.” He explained to the class how technological advances in the digital age allow us to pull back the curtain to track and monitor content in real-time.  While some firms cringe at the thought of analyzing data, at Velocity we live by it.

He said, “our team of analytics experts are always looking for new ways to turn data into opportunity – by opportunity, we mean ROI.” Conway continued, “This isn’t just your traditional web analytics; we provide detailed insight across all of our clients’ media to show them what’s working, what’s not, and how to adjust for optimization.”

After the class one of the students said via email, “much of what you said to us really resonated with me. I’ve spent some time in the music industry playing shows, and I never imagined that I would want to work with technology either. You gave me insight into something I have been curious about for a while and after hearing your story I would really like to learn more about search engine advertising and online marketing as a whole.”

Kevin Conway is an alumnus of Loyola receiving a dual JD/MBA in 2010.

UPDATE: We received a note from Dr. Todd Bacile at Loyola Univ. New Orleans. He said, “16 of my students have passed the first of two Google exams. A few more will pass the second exam to become AdWords certified in the next week.”

Additionally, the Fall issue of the Loyola Executive has an article where Dr. Bacile recalls that while talking about his class with a contact in the search marketing industry he broached the subject of having his students take the Google Adwords exam and the unnamed contact replied, “If he [Bacile] could send a student to him already certified, he would offer them a job.” We can’t be certain, but we think we might know the identity of that contact.

The Power of Focus

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The Power of Focus

 

My pastor recently sat down and had lunch with Jack Nicklaus, and he asked him how he became such a great golfer. Nicklaus said he actually wanted to play football when he was young, but realized his hands were too small to be a quarterback. He also wanted to run track, but he was too slow. It was through this process of elimination that he got to golf as the sport he was going to play.

Nicklaus had many choices available to him, but he chose to focus on the one where he had the greatest chance of success. Peter Drucker says, “Concentration is the key to economic results. No other principle of effectiveness is violated as constantly as the basic principle of concentration … Our motto seems to be, let’s do a little bit of everything.”

The world’s best businesses focus relentlessly on becoming the best in their field. The Ritz-Carlton focuses on being the best hotel chain in the world through a best-in-practice Service Excellence Culture; this legendary service model has resulted in engaged employees and customers through the concept of empowerment. When you try to do too many things, you end up losing focus on a core-competence – becoming mediocre at an array of things rather than the best in the world at one.

If you are going to become the best at your job, vocation, or hobby, choose to focus on your strengths. We all have weaknesses, but time spent improving weaknesses will yield far fewer results than time spent focusing on strengths. If you are a great salesperson but bad manager, focus on being the best salesperson in the office and turn down a promotion to sales manager. If you are great at golf but mediocre at baseball, step off the diamond and spend your time on the green or driving range.

I’ll leave you with this quote from Seth Godin, “Just about everything you learned in school about life is wrong, but the wrongest thing might very well be this: Being well rounded is the secret to success.”

Twitter rolls out Moments and Facebook test Reactions

velocity Digital Innovation, Mobile Technology Leave a Comment

The next time you login to Twitter you will notice a new icon on the bottom of your screen. The lightning bolt icon will allow you to access Twitter’s newest feature, Moments. Moments gives you access to trending stories on Twitter along with the most relevant tweets. There are several topic areas in Moments: Today, News, Sports, Entertainment, and Fun.

When you first enter Moments you will default onto the Today section, which is a collection of stories and videos from the various sections. News is selection of hard news stories and videos. For instance, when I logged in, I had live video and tweets from the recent terrorist attack in Israel show up. Sports is going to have the latest scores and sports-related stories trending on Twitter. Entertainment has tweets about new book releases, music and celebrity news, TV premieres, and fashion. Fun is where you find Buzzfeed-type stories and things that are trending that don’t fit into other categories.

This is a first attempt by Twitter to solve the question new users often ask, “I’m on Twitter now what do I do?” If you don’t follow anyone on Twitter, it can be a pretty underwhelming experience. Mentions give a new user something to do the first time they login. It also becomes a de facto source for breaking news. Considering how many journalist and news organizations use Twitter, I’m sure this is a welcomed feature.

 

Twitter Moments on iPhone

This week Facebook also began testing 6 new “reactions”

For years people have been clamoring for a dislike button, and Facebook has resisted. Well, Facebook finally decided to offer something beyond the “Like” button. The new options are “love,” “yay,” “wow,” “haha,” “sad,” and “angry.” These are quite similar to the emojis used in text messaging.

Facebook Test Reactions

 

Mark Zuckerburg felt that in certain cases people would like to display some empathy in certain situations and a “Like” wasn’t always the best choice. Facebook felt that these new “reactions” could help to make that choice easier for users. Currently the new feature is getting beta-tested with users in Ireland and Spain. No word yet from Facebook on if or when it will roll out to the rest of us.

 

WIRED TO CONNECT

velocity Market Information, Professional Development Leave a Comment

Woman using an iPhone while sitting at her Mac with a USB key on the MacClients and potential clients continually ask me what industry is our specialty. From here, I know it is going to be an uphill battle in shifting perception. Lucky for me, shaping perception (for any industry) is my specialty.

Healthcare, Consumer Packaged Goods (“CPG”), Retail, Travel, Tourism, etc. all face the same problems (opportunities). Almost all industries are becoming more consumer focused and experience-driven, which creates a consistent set of marketing needs across all industries.

This means that we have to go back to a re-examination of the traditional 4-P’s of marketing – Product, Price, Place, and Promotion (one of those few things I remember/found useful from college) – and make a complete paradigm shift to the 5 C’s of digital marketing.

 

The evolution of data, technology, and communication, along with the changing dynamics in most industries is gradually putting the consumer at the center and in full control. The ecosystem is starting to respond to consumer’s emotional and functional needs. As is evident from the past, technologies and innovation do not disrupt categories, but consumers do.

Most brands are now aiming at an always-on, seamless, omni-channel experience that will inspire behavioral change and participation. The term “omni-channel” may be a marketing buzzword, but it refers to a significant shift: marketers now need to provide a seamless consumer experience, regardless of channel or device. Consumers can now engage with a company in a physical location, an online website, a mobile app, or through social media.

Digital marketers across all industries can achieve success if they focus on the 5 C’s of digital marketing in an era that can be best described as the ‘convergence era’.

The 5 C’s:

  1. Consumer
  2. Context
  3. Content
  4. Commerce
  5. Convergence

“We need to always place the CONSUMER at the center, both in strategy and execution. CONVERGENCE is needed at all levels to overcome the challenges of fragmentation and silos. The two channel agnostic pillars of a seamless experience is CONTENT and CONTEXT. If executed properly, these 4 C’s will organically drive COMMERCE,” said Mayur Gupta, Senior VP and Head of Digital at Healthgrades.

1. CONSUMER – The consumer is connected, informed, collaborative, social, and more empowered than ever before. The consumer is the extension of your brand. The consumer’s persona, buyer’s journey, and experience must be at the center of your strategy. You can replace consumer with customer or client – bottom line, behind every B2B or B2C, there is a person – the consumer of your content, products, and services.

2. CONTEXT – the power of contextual intelligence is the ability to personalize your engagement with the consumer. Context is about knowing and understanding behavior at any point in the relationship, across all touch-points, at all times. Context is about knowing the who, what, where, when, and most importantly, why the consumer wants something, and then delivering just that, at the right time and channel of preference.

3. CONTENT – Content must be influenced, inspired, and driven based on context – relevant and useful information that is delivered just in time, pervasively across the ecosystem (channel, device, and touch-point). “Content without context or context without the ability to inspire and influence content is both meaningless and will never drive behavioral change,” said Gupta.

4. COMMERCE – Anticipating the needs of the consumer and making it easy and fast to purchase is key. Ultimately, convenience always wins.

5. CONVERGENCE – The final C, and perhaps the most challenging for marketers is convergence. By placing the CONSUMER at the center of your strategy and execution framework, marketers must find ways to drive alignment across the business and the ecosystem by constantly and vigorously championing convergence. There are hundreds of marketing technology vendors that are focusing on the art of marketing convergence using CRM, marketing automation, communities, analytics and social networking.

I suppose now would be a good time to talk about what Convergence truly is:

  • Convergence: 1. an act or instance of converging. 2. A convergent state of quality. 3. The degree or point at which lines, objects, etc., converge.

Technology has come a long way since the early days of the 21st century. As it advanced, each type of media has evolved to become more portable and interactive. These different types of media and platforms have also quickly merged together. It’s a logical progression, feeding our insatiable appetite for technology and for progress.

As technology has advanced, so have the worlds of advertising, marketing, branding, PR, public affairs, content, publishing, and business strategy. Brands and marketers are now looking for ideas that are deeply connected to culture, which can align with societal changes and help shape them. As a result, companies are starting to converge to offer a new model and to enjoy the same benefits. It’s a natural result of the media convergence we have seen happening for decades.

In my business, the edge is the complete opposite of the traditional advertising agency. It is a new approach based on a new model for marketing in revolutionary times. And we’re not alone. Businesses throughout the world are discovering that convergence is fast becoming a key business model – one that will help them to stay lean, focused, and as profitable as possible without compromising on quality.

The biggest challenge, as marketers, is the journey from strategy to execution. With the consumer at the center of this ecosystem, strategy alone is not enough; the consumer demands real and tangible experiences. This is where we need to get real and deliver a seamless experience for the consumer, keeping his or her interest, needs, and desires at the center as a human being, not a segment.

Today’s consumers are empowered and their expectations are changing; transparency, authenticity, intelligence, and accessibility are the keys to success. Businesses and marketers must now focus on arguably the most important C-word in business – culture.

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel,” said Maya Angelou.

In today’s on-demand economy, relevance is the most important currency in business. To stay relevant, businesses must adopt a customer-first culture, knowing that the path to scale is a committed, common-sense approach with competent and confident employees who exhibit the character that inspires customer loyalty and advocacy. It may sound cliché, but smart businesses and marketers recognize the only constant is change. To stay relevant, you must have the courage and discipline to strategically change and evolve to mirror an ever-evolving global culture.

We, as marketers, can learn the ins and outs of any industry. Spend some time with me, give me the time to research your business and your financial statements, and I will understand your competitive (strategic) advantage and profit margins. Therefore, clients shouldn’t pay us for being experts in a specific industry, but rather experts in the human experience. The heart of all business and commerce is people, and we need to make them feel something.

Businesses need to stop looking for so-called “industry-specific experts” and focus on finding an agency that understands the ever-evolving consumer landscape. Moreover, businesses need to find an agency that understands the human experience and specializes in social connection.

Bridging the Gap in Digital Marketing

velocity Market Information, Professional Development Leave a Comment

offlinevsonline

With the prominence and importance of online marketing in the marketplace today, the #1 question you may be asking about your company’s online efforts is, “am I doing it right?” Your website, social media, email marketing, online reputation, PPC, SEO, ….the list goes on and on…. are all so incredibly important right now that you may be losing sleep. If you are like most businesses you are counting every like, retweet, subscriber, click, follow, and positive Yelp review as an amazing personal victory! As well you should. These achievements are digital currency that can benefit your company in many ways. However, as these transactions become a bit more normative, you – especially if you are the owner of a terrestrial business – need to be thinking beyond your digital assets and begin asking, “how are my online activities translating to offline transactions?”

So many businesses tout their social numbers as a proof of actual currency. The truth is, if you are only interested in social numbers, there are a host of questionable services that will trade you “likes” and clicks for dollars. What results is a hollow following with no potential for any offline transactions. With every resource that you put into your digital strategy you should be able to gauge your ROI by placing equal value on having a prominent online presence AND on how it trickles down to your bottom line. Do not allow your online efforts to simply remain there on the web. Get them in the door!

Here are a few concepts that may help:

  1. Try to devise ways to use your message to incentivise actual visits.

  2. Focus more on the quality of your following and not just quantity. Active local followers are 10 times more likely to turn into a conversion.

  3. Balance your “calls to action” to include both growing your following, as well as, nurture store visits. “Sign up for our newsletter” should hold equal footing with “Visit Us” or “Call Us.”

  4. Pair your online offers with codes that can be redeemed in-store so that you can benchmark your message’s effectiveness. Use A/B testing to see which message generated more in-store traffic.

  5. Make sure your online messaging is consistently worded and branded with any print/radio/tv so that uniform brand recognition exists with all of your outreach.

Of course, you should also be doing everything you can to get your in-store guests to engage with your online presence. We will save that for future posts.

 

Epic Marketing Fails

velocity Advertising, Professional Development Leave a Comment

Sometimes, you’ll see an advertisement isn’t very well-thought-out. Maybe their placements are unfortunate (or is highly unfortunate), or their logo isn’t well designed (or is poorly designed). Every now and then, you’ll release an advertisement that you’ll regret immediately and will become the butt of jokes all over the internet. Below are some examples of what we would like to call Marketing Fails and why you should think, really, really hard, about making sure your ads convey the right message.

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Given the picture, 75% sounds like a pretty reasonable discount.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.57.36 PM

At least one of these ads had a clear and concise message.

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Let’s be real, the name “mama’s baking” probably didn’t do the design team any favors.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.57.05 PM

Definitely a tough choice.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.58.30 PM

If you can’t see the joke immediately, look closely at the heads and arms of the dancers.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.58.08 PM

To be fair, they didn’t claim to be auto care experts.

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 2.57.12 PM

I’m glad we found marketers whose ads don’t beat around the bush.

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Hey, can’t say they didn’t warn you.

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A reminder of how important the ‘space’ key is.

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Halls and Trojan are certainly targeting relevant markets with this one.

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There’s nothing that would make me want to travel via Turkish Airlines more than an image of their plane headed downward in a 45 degree angle.

When Athlete-Endorsements No Longer Make Sense

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Besides playing the sports they love, why do professional athletes want to become professional athletes in the first place? Usually to make money. And in an age where celebrities are used (maybe even overused) by companies to endorse products, there’s no question that athletes expect and get a piece of that pie.

Some of the most successful advertising campaigns of all time are a result of athletes becoming the faces of a company or product. In 1989, Nike aired “Bo Knows,” which features Bo Jackson (who achieved all-star status as both a Football and Baseball player) trying his hand at several different sports, with other all-time greats such as Hulk Hogan and Wayne Gretzky. This led to a wildly successful campaign that has been followed by sequels, parodies, and pop culture references. In the 90s, Michael Jordan starred in a Gatorade commercial now called “Be Like Mike” that featured a combination of a brief highlight reel, playing with neighborhood kids, and drinking Gatorade before and after each segment.  That advertisement was recently remade, only this version features shorts of Jordan in the NBA 2K video game and of current NBA all-star Carmelo Anthony and Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton singing to the tune of the song.

In both of those advertisements, the link between the company and the athlete makes sense. Nike is the largest athletic apparel and equipment in the world, and Gatorade accounts for approximately 75 percent market share in the sports drink category. Why do they make sense? Because Bo Jackson actually wore Nike apparel all day every day, and Michael Jordan actually drank Gatorade to aid in his athletic performance.

What’s happening now is different. Now in days, companies endorse athletes even if their products or services have nothing to do with sports. What’s the association between Call of Duty and basketball? Probably none, right? Don’t tell that to Clippers guard Blake Griffin who recently starred in a GameFly commercial that him flying around on a jet pack in a suit. When was the last time you saw a quarterback wearing blue jeans during a game? Never; but that’s not stopping Brett Favre and Drew Brees from rocking out their jeans for Wrangler commercials. Is Sprite a beverage that many athletes would drink, if any, for that matter? Probably not very frequently; even though LeBron James now has his own Sprite edition. And Seahawks’ star running back Marshawn Lynch participating in a Beacon Plumbing commercial is just sad.

Maybe professional athletes just want to make as much money as they can however they can. Maybe companies that find themselves losing market share are desperate to attach a famous name to their products or services. But the truth is that pairing athletes with companies that are irrelevant to the athlete and his/her sport is poor marketing and comes at a cost financially and against the integrity of the brand.

 

Why Non-Profits Should Utilize LinkedIn

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Oftentimes, a non-profit spending “too much money” will give it a bad rap. This is for a number of reasons. The biggest reason is the argument that non-profits need to limit their overhead costs in order to have more of the donation’s revenue left over to directly help the cause. In English, non-profits take some of the money that one donates (usually most of it) and use it to cover the costs of the business, such as payroll of employees. The perception is that advertising is another cost that will drain the amount of money left to contribute to the cause of that organization.

However, such notions are misguided. First, in the case of non-profits, associating the terms “overhead” and “advertising” would be misleading, because one has nothing to do with the other. Advertising for a non-profit has goals of reaching out for donations and educating the public about an important social issue. That’s not “overhead” by any definition- that’s a fundraising and program expense. But that’s not a common belief held by donors.

 

Screen Shot 2015-08-19 at 3.21.00 PM

 

(Chart by nonprofitquarterly.org)

While United Way only spends 2% of gross revenue on advertising, Red Cross and YMCA spend far less than 1%. According to a CMO Council survey, the vast majority of business owners spent less than 4% in gross revenue on advertising and marketing costs, and the remaining 42% of businesses spending more than 5%. An interesting point to the contrary is that Wounded Warriors Project spends a reported 35% of its resources in advertising and has become among the most well known veteran services organizations out there, now serving over 83,000 registered members, has offices in nearly 20 locations, and has a line of clothing by Under Armor worn by 3 college football teams. Therefore, if a non-profit (and a non-profit’s donors) is serious about growing for the purpose of raising a greater awareness for its cause, they would advertise more than they are now.

When you think of relatively inexpensive ways to advertise a non-profit organization, and when you think of social media platforms that have more than enough space to facilitate advertising with limited competition, the mind automatically wanders to LinkedIn. The professional networking social media application’s membership has been on the rise in recent years due to the millennial generation setting its footing in the workforce. While its functionality is more limited than Facebook’s, there are reasons why advertising on LinkedIn can make a lot of sense. First, you can “follow” specific companies and non-profits, which will allow you to see their posts directly on your newsfeed. There’s also a “Volunteer” section near the bottom part of your profile page that you can edit to show the broad causes that you’re interested in by editing “Causes You Care About.” For example, if I was interested in “Disaster and Humanitarian Relief,” then Habitat For Humanity could place an ad on my home page the next time I log in.

A user can directly show which causes he/she cares about which will lead to ads of suggested non-profits. And this would have more positive consequences for the organizations than solely fundraising. It would raise awareness of actual hands-on volunteer opportunities and even possibly career opportunities for those interested in the industry. For those concerned about the financial implications for non-profits using LinkedIn to promote itself, LinkedIn also offers the flexibility to set a budget, meaning the maximum amount that the organization would want to spend in one day. Lastly, advertising on this platform will grant organizations exposure to a millennial generation that is career driven and socially conscious, meaning that its users are a good target audience.

Advertising is the epitome of what it actually means to “spend money to make money.” In the case of nonprofits, the phrase should be edited to “spend money to make money to help people”. And today’s digital age allows for these organizations to promote their causes flexibly and inexpensively. While more non-profits hopefully follow Wounded Warriors Project’s model and become less fearful of investing in their advertising campaigns, using LinkedIn as a test run would not be a bad start.